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Addiction Studies Forum Inc

C.A.C.C.F.
CACCF Approved CEUs

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Courses and Workshops

Registrations now being accepted!!!
After selecting your courses, CLICK HERE to register.
 
For your convenience courses/workshops are rated by level of experience or difficulty.
Level 1 Level 1 - Entry Level
Entry level courses for those who have little or limited experience in the addictions or helping field.
Level 2
Level 2 - Intermediate
Entry level to advanced. For those with some experience or knowledge in the addictions or helping field.
Level 3
Level 3 - Advanced
For those with substantial experience in the addictions or helping field. Some material is at the clinical level of learning and is suitable for those with post secondary to university level education.
Courses are listed below by date. If you prefer, download the entire brochure by clicking on the brochure icon here > > > >

The Institute (Addiction Studies Forum Inc) reserves the right to cancel or reschedule all sessions and courses for circumstances that occur that are beyond our control.



Delegates attending the 58th Annual Institute on Addiction Studies are eligible to earn up to a maximum of 26.5 Continuing Educational Units (CEUs) as defined by the Canadian Addiction Counsellors Certification Federation.


NOTE: CACCF standards often meet or exceed other governing agencies requirements for CEUs (nurses, ATSS, CPGC, etc.) It is the responsibility of the delegate to check with their particular agency for criteria requirements. Addiction Studies Forum Inc. cannot be responsible for agencies who who accept or do not accept CACCF standards.
Sunday July 9th, 2017  

A1 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Intervention in Groups
Barb Robinson B.Ed, B.M.Sc., ICADC, LSC
Level 2
Critical incidents are observable, and progressive they do not just happen! Using the definition “a critical incident is any situation, event or incident where a group facilitator has to identify and choose an appropriate response” you will be introduced to a critical incident intervention model as it applies to addictions and mental health client groups. During this session you will be given “hands on” opportunities to describe critical incidents in your work place and identify and practice 3 dimensions of group interventions (types of interventions, levels of interventions, and intensity of interventions). Interventions will be linked to various stages of group development.

Eugene Dufour




Barb Robinson is the Program Head/Instructor at the Saskatchewan Polytechnic Addictions Counselling Program. By blending the traditional teachings and formal training, Barb has been actively involved in developing and delivering training for addictions professionals, community developers, group facilitation and community and addictions counselling for over 31 years. Besides being the current program head and instructor for the Addictions Counselling Program, Barb was instrumental in designing and delivering the first First Nations on-line training program for the front line Mental Health and Addictions Worker program integrating mental health, addictions and First Nations philosophy including the role of traditional medicine in assessment and recovery into an entire program. Barb is a Board Member for the Canadian Addiction Counsellors Certification Federation (CACCF), co-chair of the CACCF Curricula review committee, an item writer for international and Canadian certification examinations and specializes in developing addictions certification/leadership standards blending traditional First Nations philosophy and techniques with non-native techniques.


A2 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Medical Marijuana: Cure or Curse
Ron Elliot R.Ph., B.Sc.Phm.
Level 1
This presentation will create a discussion amongst participants by showing how conflicting the evidence is with respect to medical marijuana.  It is not an intent to endorse or deride the product.  The discussion will arise from current literature with a touch of the presenter's professional background and experiences as a pharmacist. Participants will find this presentation educational and informative.







Ron Elliott
is currently the Executive Director of Westover Treatment Centre in Thamesville, Ontario, and is a registered Pharmacist. Prior to accepting this role, he practiced pharmacy for over 40 years, spending 32 years as an owner/operator of a Shoppers Drug Mart store in London and in St. Thomas, Ontario. Ron is a former President of the Ontario College of Pharmacists and a former President of the Canadian Pharmacists Association and is an honorary member of both associations. He is a past President of the board of the VON Middlesex-Elgin. Ron was the recipient of the Governor-General’s Caring Canadian Award in 2008 and the Golden Jubilee Medal in 2002.


A3 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
A Fork in the Road (or the perils of self-induced analysis paralysis): Professional Dissonance as a Framework for the Contradictory Demands of Counselling Professionals
Derek Chechak MSW, PhD, RSW
Level 3
Counselling professionals in both the addiction and EAP field are apt to encounter competing demands and contradictory role obligations in their work. Professional dissonance is a novel conceptual framework that can be used to explore the influence of these contradictory functions on clinical practice, practitioner health, and organizational outcomes. This session will introduce participants to the influences of professional dissonance theory and provide an opportunity to identify and reflect on how contradictory demands can affect their practices. The facilitator will also present findings from his doctoral dissertation research which illustrates how professional dissonance relates to contemporary practice concerns among the social work profession.

NOTE: Participants are encouraged to bring a cell phone with text messaging capabilities to this session to participate in a live polling activity.


Dr. Derek Chechak is a researcher, evaluator, and implementation coach employed with the Centre for Addiction and Mental Health (CAMH). He is a Registered Social Worker, having earned his BA (Psychology), BSW (Hons.), and MSW degrees from King's University College at Western University, and his PhD from Memorial University. Dr. Chechak`s experience includes over ten years of experience in community-based health care, specialized mental health care including forensic social work and assertive community treatment, work in the developmental services sector, and a clinical leadership role for an employee assistance provider. He is a published peer-reviewed author in the areas of workplace violence and wellness, social work value conflicts, and mental health case management.

Keynote Address (click here for details)
7:00 PM - Sunday, July 9th
Laura Bhoi BA(hon), MBA
"Potential For Change
"
Plenary Address (click here for details)
9:30 AM - Thursday, July 13th
SoCirC (Social Circus Circle)
"Social Development and Support for Young People"

 
Monday July 10th, 2017

B1 9:00 am - 4:30 p.m. (full day session)
Food and Mood: Nutrition and Mental Health
Ian Robertson MSW, RSW
This all day session will focus on better understanding the mood-food connection and how it affects mental health. Fad dieting, common beliefs around the Standard American Diet and unhealthy eating habits all impact mental health. Participants will learn how to help their clients and themselves build on mental wellness through understanding: Food-Mood Link, SAD and Light, PMS (cravings and carb killers for mood), food and blues, stress and diet, depressed energy and diet, reining in the out of control appetites, food and detoxification and eating smart for mental wellness.
Your food=your mood and your mood=your food!

Ian Robertson





Ian Robertson
currently works as the Regional Clinical Supervisor for Addictions and Mental Health at the Niagara Health System. Previously, Ian has worked as a substance abuse counsellor at the Niagara Withdrawal Management Centre, the New Port Centre, as a clinical therapist for Mental Health Services, Regional Facilitator and Trainer for Mental Health, and also consultant for several community organizations. He is certified as a Clinical Traumatologist, Compassion Fatigue Specialist, and Substance Abuse Counsellor. He is trained in Trauma Incident Reduction (TIR), Level 1 & 2 of EMDR, Threat Assessment, Cognitive Behavioural Therapy, Dialectical Behavioural Therapy, Cognitive Process Therapy and Motivational Interviewing. Ian has been a speaker at international, national, provincial and regional conferences and an organizational trainer on topics such as substance abuse, trauma, concurrent disorders, mental health, youth at risk, youth threat assessment, Motivational Interviewing, Stages of Change, Organizational Trauma-informed Practices. He recently completed, in 2014, his Advanced Certification as a Clinical Supervisor from Smith College, School of Social Work in MA, USA. Ian also owns and operates a private practice in Niagara.

B2 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Self-harm: The fine line between recognizing helping from hurting
Tina Hunter RSSW, ACTP
Level 2
This workshop offers a unique approach to gaining knowledge and understanding on an often misunderstood and uncomfortable topic. Tina candidly and casually shares her own story of engaging in self abusive behaviour, how it started, why it continued and how she was able to find a healthier way of dealing with life. Tina will also share her experiences of working with a population who self harms as well as the techniques used to walk their journey with them. This workshop will take you from those who are more apt to be at risk of self harm, to the signs of those we suspect as engaging in self harm behaviour, right through the alternative approaches used to help someone who no longer wants to self harm.

Tina Hunter is a certified Trauma and Loss Consultant Supervisor and Clinical Practitioner with TLC®. She is a Registered Social Service Worker, as well as a registered mental health services provider for Crisis intervention Mental Health Counselling and the Indian Residential Schools Resolution Program for First Nations, through Health Canada. Tina has many years of valuable experience both working directly with traumatized children, adolescents and adults as well as supporting and encouraging practitioners who work with this population. Currently, Tina teaches part-time at Lambton College within the Social Services Program as well as serving as the Counselling Services Manager at Life's Seasons, which she co-founded in 2011. While still meeting with clientele at Life's Seasons, Tina also consults and facilitates workshops for schools, agencies, organizations and churches while spending one day per week at Aamjiwnaang First Nation Reserve. Most importantly, Tina is a wife, a mother of six (with 4 still at home) - through marriage, birth, and adoption, and grandmother; of many now that her foster children have grown up. And because Tina doesn't have enough to do, she lives on a small farm with horses, chickens, and pets.

B3 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Teachings of the Medicine Wheel
K. Paul MacKenzie CTR, CTSS
Teachings of the Medicine Wheel is a holistic journey through It’s teachings to better understand ourselves as we walk upon Mother Earth. “Symbols give us meaning and meaning gives us purpose” This session will cover the following teachings of the Medicine Wheel and will give the pariticpants a better understanding of Native culture including the following:

  • Traditional Welcome/ Introductions
  • Smudging
  • Medicine Bundle
  • Concept 4 Directions
  • Concept of Self
  • Concept of Vision
  • Concept of 4 Aspects of everyone’s nature
  • Concept of Learning
  • Concept of 4 Races of Mankind
  • Concept 4 Stages of Life
  • Concept 4 Seasons
  • Give away ceremony
  • Sacred Teachings of Turtle Island
  • Group Dreamcatcher

K. Paul MacKenzie of the Mi'kmaq First Nation, Warrior of the Wolf Clan, is a former Halifax Regional Police Officer (Rtd), having served in Patrol Division, Mounted Division and as the Employee and Family Assistance Program Coordinator. Paul is presently the Firefighters and Family Assistance Program Manager for the Halifax Regional Fire and Emergency. Paul has also worked with the Native Community in the Maritimes as the liaison officer between the Regional Police and the Native Community. He continues to work with the Native Community across Canada. As well, he has served on the Atlantic First Nations Task Force on HIV/AIDS, former healing consultant for Teachings of the Sweet Grass Braid Society (survivors of residential school), a facilitator of the teachings of the Medicine Wheel and an associate counselor for the Eagles' Nest Recovery House. Paul is the former Director of the Spirit of the Eagles' Feather Society. Paul is a past member of the Board of Directors for the Canadian Traumatic Stress Network. He is also currently a member in good standing with the International Critical Incident Stress Foundation, the Association of Traumatic Stress Specialists, the Canadian Association of Suicide Prevention, the Suicide Information & Education Centre, and the former Nova Scotia EAP Association (Past President). Paul is past Vice Chair of the Executive Board of Directors for Alcare Place, an addictions recovery house located in Halifax, NS and recently served as the Atlantic Regional Director on the National Board of Directors for MADD Canada. He is presently serving as a Peer Support Special Advisor with the Mood Disorders of Canada Board.

B4 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Animal Assisted Interventions
Julie Casey MSW

The session will introduce a brief history of human-animal engagement, the development of Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) and the current field use with diverse populations including addiction, mental health, trauma, disabilities, seniors, education and rehabilitation. An overview of Nourishing Hearts Animal Assisted Interventions will be provided, along with the current research and practice initiatives working with seniors living in long term care. The intervention goals are to decrease pharmaceutical use while improving moods, social interactions and behaviours. The process on how to determine if a person is appropriate or not will be discussed, followed by an AAT demonstration and interaction with the animals.

Julie Casey
is an Animal Assisted Therapy (AAT) specialist and certified equine assisted mental health psychotherapist. Through a mobile and farm-based practice, Julie facilitates AAT with diverse farm animal species, including a miniature horse, goats, sheep, rabbits, and chickens to address biopsychosocial challenges of individuals and families across the lifespan. The innovative mobile service facilitates AAT with individuals living in residential and long term care facilities and/or participants at institutional settings including schools, treatment facilities and day programs. Julie follows an evidence-based practice model with current research initiatives studying the impact of AAT with residents in long term care.


B5 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thin Line: Daily Managing of the Professional Soul
Susan Alexander MSW
Level 2

This workshop takes a different, highly introspective approach to caring for yourselves in challenging work and workplaces. The first half of the workshop identifies the reasons we are exceptionally challenged in front line work; the reasons we get impacted (largely based in the brain’s reaction to “danger” in the workplace) and how we need to communicate need to our management groups.

The second half of the workshop is all about ways that the professional can create a personal professional identity - “reasons for showing up” that are completely individual and how to maintain that focus when derailed by clients and colleagues. Creatively considering alternative strategies for maintaining a sense of stabilization in our daily engagement with traumatized clients (and colleagues!)

This training would be suitable for intermediate level practitioners with some experience in providing counselling and therapy in order to make the content relevant to individual reflection.

Susan Alexander is a Psychotherapist who maintains a private practice in London, Ontario where she specializes in individual trauma therapy including single incident and complex trauma, military operational trauma, and front line emergency services trauma (police, fire, paramedic, health care, social services). Susan is a consultant in on-site support to community disaster and workplace treatment for groups experiencing sudden traumatic events and provides professional training to organizations in the area of front line trauma work; practitioner self care and patient/client trauma intervention.

Susan holds a Bachelor of Social Work degree (1997) from King’s University College in London, Ontario and a Master of Social Work degree (1999) from the University of Toronto. As a lecturer at King’s College School of Social Work, Susan designed and delivered a comprehensive Crisis and Trauma course curriculum to graduating Bachelor of Social Work students (2002 - 2014). Prior to entering into private practice full time in 2009, Susan worked in the community with the Ministry of the Attorney General in the court system with Victims of Crime and with London Health Sciences Centre in Children’s Emergency Care. Working with professionals exposed to potentially toxic work comprises the primary part of her private practice and professional training.

After many years of working alongside police officers, crown attorney’s, doctors, nurses and other front-line trauma workers, Susan developed a special interest in designing curriculum for professionals exposed to trauma through their work life now known as Occupational Stress and, within the Canadian Armed Forces, as Operation Stress Injury. A full list of professional training experience is available at www.susanalexander.ca


B6 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Using a Systems Approach in Treating Parents with Addiction Issues in Separation & Divorce: Challenges & Possibilities
Ramona Alaggia MSW, PhD
Rick Csiernik BSc, BSW, MSW, PhD, RSW, CCAC
Level 2
While family remains the foundation of our society, upwards of half of couples with children will separate and/or divorce. Often the root cause is an addiction issue. This workshop will provide an overview of family systems theory as an alternative approach to the family as disease model of addiction treatment. As well, the lack of family work we do in the addiction field and its relationship to lapse and relapse will be discussed. Actual case studies will be used to assist participants apply the theory to practice. The goal of the workshop is to highlight why individuals and agencies need to include families in their practice and to offer them some assistance in doing so.

Ramona Alaggia earned her M.S.W. and Ph.D. at the University of Toronto where she is an Associate Professor and holds the FactorInwentash Chair in Children’s Mental Health. Coming from an ecological orientation she uses her considerable practice experience in family systems work to inform her clinical teaching and research. Her work also focuses on gender and violence in families including child sexual abuse, intimate partner violence, and understanding the effects of exposure to violence on children’s mental health and important resilience factors. Ramona works closely with agencies serving families experiencing violence and abuse to evaluate and improve services. She has a coedited book in its 2nd Edition –“Cruel but not Unusual: Violence in Canadian Families”.

Rick Csiernik BSc, BSW, MSW, PhD, RSW, CCAC, Professor, School of Social Work, King's University College at Western University has written and edited fourteen books, including Substance Use and Abuse: Everything Matters, Just Say Know: A Counsellor’s Guide to Psychoactive Drugs and Responding to the Oppression of Addiction, authored nearly 200 peer reviewed articles and book chapters and has been an invited presenter to over 200 national and international conferences, workshops and seminars. He has been part of research teams that have received over three million dollars in funding and has been on the King's University College Honor Role of teaching 17 consecutive times. Rick was the co-developer
of the McMaster University Addiction Studies Program where he has taught for 30 years and where he was inaugural recipient of the McMaster University Instructor Appreciation award.

B7 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Thorny Issues for Addiction Counsellors and EFAP Peer Referral Agents
Beth Reade MD, FRCPC
Level 2
This interactive workshop will focus on a variety of topics including Loss and Grief, Chronic Pain and return to work issues for clients with substance abuse issues. We will look at ways to support clients through these issues and other common triggers for clients.








Dr. Elizabeth Reade
is a Consulting Psychiatrist. She has provided expert medical care at a Canadian psychiatric hospital for over 20 years, treating individuals with mood and anxiety disorders, addictions, co-occurring disorders and chronic mental illnesses. She has also worked in occupational health as the Medical Director of Return to Work Services. In the past, she was the Medical Consultant for 4 outpatient mental health day programs nationwide and for a psychiatric hospital Admitting Department. She has also worked as a Consulting Psychiatrist at the University of Guelph and at University of Waterloo.

She is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at McMaster University. She enjoys teaching medical students and supervising psychiatric residents. Dr. Reade has published and presented numerous papers at national medical conferences. A graduate in Medicine from University of Toronto in 1982, Dr. Reade initially trained in Family Medicine in Ottawa, Ontario. She completed her Psychiatry residency at the University of Calgary, Alberta. Dr. Reade is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in Psychiatry. She has experience in public speaking on mental health issues for cable television, CBC documentaries and local agencies. Dr. Reade is an exceptional advocate of mental health and addiction recovery.

B8 7:00 p.m. - 9:30 p.m. (Special Evening Session)
Scar of the Feather / Healing Through Song
Corene Cheeseman CAG II, CGC, SSW
H. Neil Monague
Level 1
S.C.A.R. (Spirit, Culture, Attitude, Responsibilities) is a workshop that includes information on the losses and changes experienced by Native Nations since the arrival of other Non-Native Nations. Topics will include residential schools and the changes that have occurred to the various Nations over 500 years. This interactive workshop will also engage participants in a journey of healing through native song. This is an excellent opportunity for counsellors to gain the cultural knowledge and background of Native Nations when working with native clients who are suffering from addiction.

Corene Cheeseman of the Mohawk Nation, Turtle Clan was born and raised on Six Nations in a family of 10 children. A college graduate and Certified Addictions Counsellor, Corene’s background has been in the addictions field for the last 20 years. She presently is an Aboriginal Alcohol and Drug worker at the Hamilton Regional Indian Centre in Ontario.

H. Neil Monague is of the Beausoleil First Nation and has been on spiritual journey for 26 years in which he has gathered much of his traditional teachings from his teachers and surroundings. Dealing with his own spirit has given him the opportunity to embark on a road in helping others to strengthen their own spirit by way of song, drum, and smudge.


Tuesday July 11th, 2017

C1 9:00 am - 4:30 p.m. (Full day session)
The modern Opioid Pandemic or Opioid Dependence, Treatment and Pharmacotherapies
Jordan Anderson RP, ICADC, OSC
Level 1
This session will cover the following: Describe the impact of opiate use on clients, History of Opiates and their evolution as a substance of abuse, Break down categories and sub-categories of opiates/ opioids, Application of withdrawal management techniques, Identification of withdrawal / using symptoms, Harm reduction processes for pre contemplative clients, Suboxone, naltrexone, methadone 101 and Current trends in Opiate Addiction ( I.E. – Fentanyl, CarFentanyl, Narcan).

Jodan Anderson



Jordan Anderson
is a Registered Psychotherapist with a specialization in Opiate addiction, mental health and Tobacco Cessation. Jordan Anderson also has a International Certification as a drug and alcohol counsellor with the CACCF. Over the last 5 years, Jordan Anderson has worked for Renascent treatment Center in Brooklin, Ont. as the Primary Opiate Specialist and Case manger with adult males in recovery from a variety of concurrent disorders. Jordan Anderson has recently left Renascent and moved on to a new and exciting career with Alpha House Recovery Community as the Executive Director of the Center. In addition to Jordan’s current vocational position, he is also a member of the Professional Advisory board with Fleming College, The marketing Committee of the CACCF and a member of the Harm Reduction Network of Ontario.

C2 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Practical Tips from Addiction Psychiatry
Beth Reade MD, FRCPC
Level 2

Individuals who have an addiction plus a co-occurring mental illness face a worse prognosis and often require additional help in their recovery. This workshop will: review the principles of assessing and managing co-occurring psychiatric symptoms, demystify psych meds and teach and practice useful clinical skills including an intro to Motivational Interviewing.









Dr. Elizabeth Reade
is a Consulting Psychiatrist. She has provided expert medical care at a Canadian psychiatric hospital for over 20 years, treating individuals with mood and anxiety disorders, addictions, co-occurring disorders and chronic mental illnesses. She has also worked in occupational health as the Medical Director of Return to Work Services. In the past, she was the Medical Consultant for 4 outpatient mental health day programs nationwide and for a psychiatric hospital Admitting Department. She has also worked as a Consulting Psychiatrist at the University of Guelph and at University of Waterloo.

She is an Associate Professor of Psychiatry at McMaster University. She enjoys teaching medical students and supervising psychiatric residents. Dr. Reade has published and presented numerous papers at national medical conferences. A graduate in Medicine from University of Toronto in 1982, Dr. Reade initially trained in Family Medicine in Ottawa, Ontario. She completed her Psychiatry residency at the University of Calgary, Alberta. Dr. Reade is a Fellow of the Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons of Canada in Psychiatry. She has experience in public speaking on mental health issues for cable television, CBC documentaries and local agencies. Dr. Reade is an exceptional advocate of mental health and addiction recovery.


C3 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Ethical Dilemmas in Addiction Counselling
Tom Gabriel (Dipl.)ACW, ICADC, CCAC
Level 2
Professional ethics that are established, adopted and adhered to not only protect the public, but also protect the counsellor. This workshop will examine and discuss how addiction counselors can avoid pitfalls and traps that lead to ethical dilemmas. Also discussed will be the “gray areas” that can occur within the counselor/client relationship that can lead to problems.

Tom Gabriel is certified as an International Alcohol and Drug Counsellor (ICADC), a Certified Canadian Addictions Counsellor (CCAC) and received a diploma as an Addiction Care Worker from McMaster University in Hamilton, Ontario. His extensive back ground includes 35 years as a former Police Officer that has given him a unique perspective with those who suffer from addiction not only from the streets of Toronto, but also within his own profession when dealing with colleagues and their families during his eight year tenure with the Toronto Police Service’s Employee and Family Assistance Program. In 2012 he retired from the Police Service but continued to pursue his passion of assisting Service Members and families as he changed careers to work at the Toronto Police Association as an EFAP Consultant, Crisis and Addictions Counsellor. To recognize his achievements in policing, he was awarded with the Queen's Diamond Jubilee Medal and Renascent Foundation’s Peter Armstrong Award for his work with Service Members and their families.

Tom is presently the President of Addiction Studies Forum Inc. (Annual Institute on Addiction Studies), a Member of the Board of Directors for Alpha House (long term addiction recovery home for men in Toronto) and has been appointed as a Special Advisor - Peer Support Services, for Mood Disorders Society of Canada and Peer Advisor for Badge of Life Canada. Tom has presented in many venues for police agencies, conferences, colleges, private companies and other speaking engagements including appearances on local television, radio and other media releases in regards to addiction and mental health issues. His passion is to assist those suffering from addiction and related mental health issues particularly front line responders and their families.


C4 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Suicide is not Taboo: An exploration of Complicated Grief and Self-Care though the Process
Louise F. Giroux PhD, (C)OACCPP
Level 1
Breaking the silence of ‘Suicide’ is the focus of this presentation.  The complicated grief of survivors is key to healthy grieving.  This workshop will explore the area of Suicide, and the complicated grief that ensues.  The speaker will use the latest suicide of a therapist and the follow up as an example.  There will be a brief presentation of the essence of the word ‘suicide’ and its historical and cultural variations. Also, the suicide check will be presented.  We will explore the process of complicated grief with  engagement with participants, their own experiences or others’.  There will be a brief presentation on the steps and process of complicated grief.  Participants will explore in small groups, the area of ‘self-care’ as it pertains to their work in addictions, and their various methods of self-care.  They will be invited to draw a concrete plan for their own self-care in the future.

Louise Giroux is a native of Northern Ontario. She spent many years in Toronto, where she did her graduate studies and practiced psychotherapy. She taught at the Masters program in Counselling, directed mental health clinics and supervised many counselors. Louise is an Adlerian therapist. She believes change is possible, that we can edit our personality and behaviour. All it takes is motivation. In Toronto, she provided counseling for the EFAP program at Toronto Police. Presently, she works with physicians referred by OMA. Her experience is wide and her demeanor engaging and resourceful.

C5 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Existence, Spirituality and Relatedness in Addictions: Existential and Spirituality Issues, in Recovery and Counselling
Dennis Kimberley BA, MSW, PhD, RSW
Level 3
Addictions and mental health services have attended to biological, psychological and social factors, with little attention to spirituality and existential issues, though some have espoused biopsychosocial—spiritual paradigms. In recovery, the “Serenity Prayer” speaks to the need for a relationship with a higher power AND for an existential shift from a self and life out of control to one of serenity, even in the face of personal and human suffering. Some 12 Step processes speak to a higher “Power” and related beliefs, attitudes and values associated with existential healing paths, existential limits of human agency and finding meaning in suffering. Those seeking counselling-therapy services, often wish to explore their own as well as collective spiritual and existential issues such as relatedness versus emptiness. Some clients complain, especially as recovery moves through middle stages, that counsellors “cut them off” when they try to deepen their spiritual and existential explorations in navigating the paradoxes of everyday life such as finding meaning in silences and humility, while avoiding “false pride”.

This workshop examines: 1. expressions of spiritual needs, “meaning in life” concerns, existential contexts, and existential shifts, as well as how they interact with relatedness to persons and situations who-which may support addiction or recovery, or support relapse; 2. developing appropriate and wise ways to appreciate and meet spiritual and existential needs on pathways through suffering, non-narcissistic relatedness, and to recovery. 3. getting beyond evidence-based and knowledge-based models of help, to adding wisdom-based pathways to change; 4. appreciating recovery as being supported by both goal directed actions and discovery processes as “in the moment” growth experiences; 5. considering where to go in therapy when those we help pose questions of the form: Who am I, sometimes I feel soulless and empty; is my addicted “self” the real me; in what ways am I unique? What is my life as lived; what is my life as lived all about? When is it time to change what has not been working for me; when is it time to hand over control to a higher power? When do I take responsibility? Where am/are I/we going “in life as lived” AND “in life as possible”? Why do I keep undermining my strengths, progress, resiliences, supports, capacities and potential, while exacerbating my vulnerabilities and suffering? Why do I feel empty and disconnected? How do I use spirituality and relational supports to help heal, recover, replace emptiness with relatedness, take responsibility for my existence, learn from my suffering, be more authentic, accept who I am, and move forward in a complex and uncertain existence to become who I can be? Aboriginal spirituality and existential narratives may add to the richness healing options!


 

 

Dr. Kimberley has been involved in addictions practice as a therapist, supervisor, educator, consultant, scholar, and professional-expert witness since 1966. He has 45 years experience and over 40,000 hours of clinical experience. As a former psychiatric social worker, and Director with the Addiction Research Foundation, Dennis promoted integrated intervention with clients experiencing sexual exploitation interacting with substance abuse as part of his interest in concurrent disorders and complex trauma in addictions. His experience resulted in him being appointed to Canadian expert panels and training activities on concurrent disorders (1990’s). Dennis’ work with sex abuse victims and sex offenders (1980’s), led him to become a leader in promoting treatment of sex addictions (1990’s). As well, Dennis has had a longstanding interest in transgenerational addictions and transgenerational developmental impacts. Among his current projects is the impact of complex trauma on addictions and mental health issues, associated with transgenerational survivors of unjust “Indian” residential schools placements. He has presented, offered training and has written numerous chapters and articles, nationally and internationally.


C6 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Trauma, Abuse and Addiction
Linda Antoniazzi, MSW, RSW, CTS, CTR
Level 1
This workshop will provide information about the traumatic stress response and how addictions are often a maladaptive means of coping with trauma and abuse symptoms.
  • Initial client assessments should include both histories of addictions and of abuse/trauma
  • How early childhood experiences increase the susceptibility to addictions and can interfere with recovery
  • The Stress Response and how the body and mind are affected
  • Common reasons for addictions in trauma survivors
  • Other co-morbid diagnoses – ABI, Bipolar Disorder, learning disabilities





Linda Antoniazzi
has been a registered Social Worker in the Province of Ontario since 1989. She worked as an Adult Protective Services Worker, including being a public trustee, and as an individual, marital, and family therapist with a Family Service Bureau before working for 17 years in the field of child protection and abuse treatment. She taught various college courses in the Developmental Services Worker, Social Services Worker, Police Foundations, and Law and Security programs for Sheridan College, and she was deemed an expert witness in the Halton and Hamilton Family Courts on child protection matters.

For more than 25 years, Ms. Antoniazzi has specialized in treating persons victimized by childhood sexual, physical, and mental abuse, as well as rape, cult/ritual abuse, domestic violence, military trauma, and life-threatening events such as severe vehicular or workplace accidents. She has been instrumental in the development and ongoing training of Peer Support Teams to assist Children's Aid Society staff in the event of traumatic incidents, and has provided individual and group therapy to victims of abuse and trauma, including firemen, police, and veterans.

Ms. Antoniazzi holds an MSW from McMaster University, as well as a BA in Sociology (with undergraduate studies in Psychology and Criminology), and a BSW from the University of Windsor. She is also certified internationally in the areas of Trauma Treatment, Critical Incident Response, and Clinical Hypnosis. She is a Certified Trauma Responder and a Certified Trauma Treatment Specialist with the Association of Traumatic Stress Specialist and she has been a member of the International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies since 2006. She is a registered treatment provider for Veterans, RCMP and Military personnel with Blue Cross/Medavie and with Victim Quick Response Program, in addition to being a registered provider with Health Canada, First Nations and Inuit Health Branch.

C7 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Yoga Warriors Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and the Mind Body Connection
Karen McCullough, RYT
Level 1
To provide evidence-based sensory enhanced Hatha Yoga methodology to prevent or alleviate symptoms of combat stress (COSR) or post-traumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and to include those from other high stress environments in addition to the caregivers and family members of those affected. Develop proactive traumatic stress management skills so symptoms do not progress to post-traumatic stress disorder. Develop the capacity to maintain a flexible mind-set, one that is both “battle-ready” in response to threat as well as able to return to normal state of arousal once the threat has passed. Manage stress in day-to-day life before it leads to emotional dysregulation (e.g. anger, anxiety, irritability) and/or inappropriate behavioral responses (e.g. substance abuse, impaired interpersonal interactions, unhealthy lifestyles). Improve self-acceptance and self-esteem through the use of affirmations designed to reverse the spiral of negative thinking patterns.

Karen McCullough
has worked for the Peel Regional Police for 17 years, beginning her career as a Communicator - Dispatching and Call taking for 8 years before being assigned to the Organizational Wellness Bureau where she is today. Karen works with First Responders and members with Critical Incident Stress and Peer Support. She conducts one on one Peer Support with members and coordinates and participate in debriefs for their CIRT (critical incident response team). Karen is a registered Yoga Teacher at her own studio where she teaches Yoga Warriors for Post Traumatic Stress Disorder and Hatha Yoga.


Wednesday July 12th, 2017

D1 9:00 am - 4:30 p.m. (Full Day Session)
Intervening on the Adolescent Substance User
Hamish White CACD, HSC, SSW
Dawna Alexander MSW, RSW
Level 2
Discussions of strategies that through our experience have been helpful in supporting youth and families where substance misuse is a problem. Illustration of steps from denial to acceptance to sobriety and how we encourage the family and youth to participate in effective recovery and continuing care plan. Participants will learn how to endorse and sustain recovery from the first meeting, assessment stage, treatment and aftercare using a team approach. Learn why kids learn and why they quit.






Hamish White
Hamish White is a certified alcohol and drug dependency counsellor who has worked in the addiction and mental health fields for the past 35 years. He enjoys a reputation as being a skillful clinician yet “down-to-earth” with common-sense solutions to problems that occur when families and clients are struggling with addiction recovery issues. He is well known in the addiction treatment, health professional and recovery communities. Hamish is recognized by his colleagues and peers throughout North America for his expertise and is the 2014 recipient of the prestigious Peter Armstrong Award of Excellence in recognition of his long standing support, contribution and outstanding dedication to client based and family inclusive counselling in the Toronto community. Hamish has vast experience working with youth and families and is familiar with many excellent resources all over Canada and the United States. He is certified by the Canadian Addiction Counsellors Certification Federation and is the founder, coordinator and director of Recovery Counselling Services.





Dawna Alexander
conducts intake assessments with families and facilitates the Parent Support Groups as well as providing individual, couple, and family counselling at Recovery Counselling Services. She is usually the first person parents see when they are looking for help with a young family member. With extensive training in family counselling, she provides the information, direction, and support families require when dealing with the powerful impact addiction can have on family members. Dawna has been in the counselling profession for the past 40 years. She has experience in the child protection field and working with people with life threatening illness and their families, has worked in geriatrics with families and their elderly parents experiencing senility and Alzheimer related dementia, expertise in trauma and issues of abuse, crisis intervention, and working with families and addiction. Dawna has a Masters Degree in Social Work from the University of Toronto and is a Registered Social Worker.   Dawna is a member of the  Ontario Association of Social Workers, the Canadian Addiction Counsellors Certification Federation, and the Ontario and American Association of Marital and Family Therapists. She has been with RCS since 2006.

D2 9:00 am - 12 noon
Practical Spirituality
Barb Robinson B.Ed, B.M.Sc., ICADC, LSC
Level 1
Spiritual literacy, spiritual dissonance and cosmic dissonance. Discussions and research over time has indicated that somehow spirituality plays a major role in substance use, mental health, addictions and recovery. What we do know is that there is more to us than a physical body that interacts with the world within our “self” and outside of our “self”. We spend a lot of time trying to define it and provide evidence that it exists but not often do we actually get to practice activities that may lead us to move beyond the lively debate stage. In this session a holistic-whole person approach will be used to practice several interactive activities that are practical and simple to identify, discuss and explore spirituality as it applies to mental health and addictions. All supplies will be included in the session.

Eugene Dufour




Barb Robinson is the Program Head/Instructor at the Saskatchewan Polytechnic Addictions Counselling Program. By blending the traditional teachings and formal training, Barb has been actively involved in developing and delivering training for addictions professionals, community developers, group facilitation and community and addictions counselling for over 31 years. Besides being the current program head and instructor for the Addictions Counselling Program, Barb was instrumental in designing and delivering the first First Nations on-line training program for the front line Mental Health and Addictions Worker program integrating mental health, addictions and First Nations philosophy including the role of traditional medicine in assessment and recovery into an entire program. Barb is a Board Member for the Canadian Addiction Counsellors Certification Federation (CACCF), co-chair of the CACCF Curricula review committee, an item writer for international and Canadian certification examinations and specializes in developing addictions certification/leadership standards blending traditional First Nations philosophy and techniques with non-native techniques.

D3 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
My Best Friend the Bottle: Substance and Non-substance Addictions as Compromised Attachments, Assessment and Treatment Implications
Dennis Kimberley BA, MSW, PhD, RSW
Level 2
The metaphor of the “bottle”, or the “hit”, or of “streaming sex partners” being my best friend(s) is common in addictions treatment; it is important to recognize that these frames of reference have embedded in them, a strong assumption related to the links between attachment and bond dynamics and addictions. Therapy and other interpersonal helping processes presume that interdependence is part of the human element. Some practitioners have suggested that addictions are attachment disorders and associated interventions should attend to attachment and bond dynamics in assessment, treatment, and healing. Many addictions interventions attend to: 1 the “use of self” in relationship to support recovery and healing; 2. the building of pro-sobriety and efficacious social supports to enable recovery and sustained healing; 3. creating more meaning in life through unmediated person-to-person relationships with a higher power AND more meaningful and genuine terrestrial relationships ranging from children and life-partners, to friends and “mother earth”; 4. working with attachment and bond dynamics within the context of real-time recovery and healing moments. Aboriginal social connection and social support narratives may add to the richness of healing options!

In addition, this workshop examines: 1. attachment and bond dynamics and deficits, in childhood social history, contributing to addictions risk and harm in the present, as well as social-developmental protections; 2. age-stage significant attachment and bond dynamics during adolescence, including in biopsychosexual—spiritual development; 3. expression of attachment issues in adult hood; 4. development of late-onset attachment issues in old age; 5. the exacerbation of attachment issues associated with trauma-related addictions; 6. substituting relatedness for emptiness; 7. linking attachment and associated compromised capacity to self-regulate emotionally, with addictions, concurrent disorders, and recovery; 8. insecure-anxious and secure attachments, avoidant and receptive attachments, disorganized and stable attachments, as well as indiscriminant and discriminant attachments, as challenges in addictions recovery and interventions; 9. mutually interactive influences of addictions challenges and compromised attachments, and the interactions of sustained recovery and positively supportive attachments, as well as the complex triangulation of trauma and attachment and addictions; 10. links between positive changes in social bonds and sustained recovery; attachment dynamics in the helping relationship and effective social supports; 11. clinical implications of the detached self as a stable identity, and pre-occupation with social bonds as integrated identities; 12. clinically significant complexities at the interface of attachment issues with concurrent disorders such as personality disorders.



 

 

Dr. Kimberley has been involved in addictions practice as a therapist, supervisor, educator, consultant, scholar, and professional-expert witness since 1966. He has 45 years experience and over 40,000 hours of clinical experience. As a former psychiatric social worker, and Director with the Addiction Research Foundation, Dennis promoted integrated intervention with clients experiencing sexual exploitation interacting with substance abuse as part of his interest in concurrent disorders and complex trauma in addictions. His experience resulted in him being appointed to Canadian expert panels and training activities on concurrent disorders (1990’s). Dennis’ work with sex abuse victims and sex offenders (1980’s), led him to become a leader in promoting treatment of sex addictions (1990’s). As well, Dennis has had a longstanding interest in transgenerational addictions and transgenerational developmental impacts. Among his current projects is the impact of complex trauma on addictions and mental health issues, associated with transgenerational survivors of unjust “Indian” residential schools placements. He has presented, offered training and has written numerous chapters and articles, nationally and internationally.


D4 9:00 am - 12:00 noon
Substance Use and Ability Issues
Melissa Brideau BSW, MSW
Level 1
This workshop's primary aim is to increase the insight of various service providers on the barriers that are prevalent for those contending with coexisting substance use and ability issues. It is hoped that from this workshop, professionals will not only be better informed about challenges currently facing this population, but that professionals will utilize this knowledge to inform their work with future clients experiencing such issues in an effort to provide the most comprehensive treatment options regardless of one's unique needs and goals.

Melissa Brideau completed her BSW and MSW degrees at King’s University College in London, Ontario. She works as a social worker/advocate assisting those individuals having difficulty navigating various social benefit systems. Her research interests focus on disability issues, addiction/substance use and the many barriers that are often insurmountable to those individuals with ability issues who wish to access appropriate and comprehensive treatment.

D51:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Substance Abuse and Eating Disorders: Comorbidity, Commonality and Treatment
Sherry Van Blyderveen PhD
Level 2
Rates of eating disorders are higher among populations struggling with substance use and abuse (35%) than in the general population (3%). Diagnostic criteria are similar (e.g. preoccupation, sacrificing other interests, inability to stop, continuation in the face of negative consequences). Both conditions are influenced by genetic, biological, environmental (e.g. social pressures, family, media, trauma), and psychological factors (e.g. impulsivity); tend to be chronic in nature with high rates of relapse; and affect brain function. In addition to having a shared etiology, the two conditions tend to exacerbate one another (e.g. substance use as a strategy for appetite suppression, weight loss associated with substance use triggering an eating disorder, both serve as an avoidance-based coping strategy). Treatment for the co-occurrence of these conditions should include a thorough assessment of the interplay between the conditions and address both conditions simultaneously.

Dr Sherry Van Blyderveen is a psychologist and the Program Director for the Eating Disorders Program at Homewood Health Centre in Guelph. She is an Assistant Professor (Part-time) in the Department of Pediatrics at McMaster University. Her previous experiences include a variety of hospital, community mental health, private practice and correctional settings.

D6 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Stage 2 Relapse Prevention Program: A Viable Option For Residential Treatment
Deb Cavanaugh ICADC, CCAC
Level 2
Participants will learn about Stage 2 recovery as an option for residential treatment that does not require re-entry into the standard 19 day or longer programs. Clients may have have already accessed these programs and continue to relapse. Stage 2 is an intensive program over a shorter time period that focuses on the underlying factors that can lead to relapse if not addressed. These factors may include family of origin issues, relational problems and issues of unresolved anger.

Deb Cavanaugh is the Director of Stage 2 at Westover and was responsible for the development and implementation of the program. She has worked in the field of addictions for 15 years and is I.C.A.D.C. and C.C.A.C. certified with the Canadian Addiction Counsellors Certification Federation.

D7 1:30 p.m. - 4:30 p.m.
Crystal Methamphetamine: Bio-Psycho-Social Implications
Jesse Minns BSW
Level 1
Session attendees will be presented with a first-hand account of interacting with individuals using crystal methamphetamine (CMA) from the perspective of a front-lines social worker. The session will include relevant information regarding the biological, psychological, and social implications of CMA use and the implications for social service workers. Appropriate treatment options and harm-reductions strategies will also be discussed.

Jesse Minns is currently enrolled in the Masters of Social Work program at Kings University College in London Ontario. Upon completing his bachelors of Social Work, Jesse gained a keen interest in working with those experiencing addiction and dependence issues as it became apparent that addiction transgresses all socio/economic classes and poses a complex and varying approach to treatment. He has devoted the last four years to working the front lines at a mental health drop in center, wherein he has witnessed first hand the impact of mental health, addiction and poverty on individuals. As a result of these experiences Jesse has found a passion and inspiration in fostering individual, family and community wellness in his own community of London Ontario. In his leisure time, Jesse enjoys spending time playing the drums, spending time with his beautiful family and more recently, following American politics.

Thursday July 13th, 2017  
Plenary Address (click here for details)
9:30 AM - Thursday, July 13th
SoCirC (Social Circus Circle)
"Social Development and Support for Young People"

        Closing ceremony and BBQ Farewell lunch will follow the Plenary Address .
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